Dog Guide – Dogs and sheep – the potentially deadly combo


This week we look at the important topic of dogs and sheep and just why farmers need to make sure their farm dog is under control at all times.

Dog Guide – Dogs and sheep – the potentially deadly combo

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This week we look at the important topic of dogs and sheep and just why farmers need to make sure their farm dog is under control at all times.

It's tupping season for many sheep farmers around the country. It’s a time when rams are busy doing their job and in heat sheep need some extra attention. Sadly as reported this week sheep attacks are back in the headlines.

This week we look at properly controlling your dog and what tips you can take to make sure they are not bothering or worrying your or neighbours sheep.

Here are some simple guidelines to remember for all dog owners.

Your dog must have a licence.

It’s the law now and all dogs over four months of age must have a licence.

Collar.

If you own a farm dog you need a collar. The dog may need to be locked in at night or if bringing your young pup out to the fields have them on a leash and collar to prevent livestock becoming alarmed.

Putting animals to bed

Putting your dog in at night is the safest and most practical thing you can do to prevent sheep attacks. If he cant get out he cant do the wrong thing.

Vigilance

If you see roaming dogs let your neighbours know. Roaming dogs can attract other dogs and lead to a pack which may or may not attack sheep.

For sheep owners there’s also a helpful list of things to remember.

  1. Stop the dogs
    On encountering a dog attack on sheep, the first priority must be to stop the attack immediately, apprehend the marauding dog or dogs and look after the welfare of the sheep.
  2. Follow the Law
    It is very important that sheep farmers are aware of and follow the law, in the context of protecting their sheep flock against marauding dogs – Read the 1986 Control of Dogs Act – Defence in action for damages for shooting a dog.
  3. Inform the Gardaí
    It is very important that a sheep farmer would notify the Gardai of any dog attack on their sheep. If a dog is shot for worrying a sheep flock, the person who shot the dog must notify the member in charge at the nearest Garda Station to the place where the dog was shot, within forty-eight hours.

It is important that the owner of the sheep would report the incident in full, make an official complaint and request that a full investigation is undertaken and report filed. In addition, the farmer should request a site visit from the Garda.

  1. Ring the Dog Warden
    Immediate contact should be made with the local dog warden, informing them of any sheep attack and the full details should be reported with a request for a site visit and full report to be filed.
  2. Contact the IFA
    All dog attacks should be notified to the local IFA regional office or head office, and the local IFA branch representative and member of the National Sheep Committee from the County involved should be informed.
  3. Ring the Vet
    To look after any injured sheep and protect the welfare of the flock, a vet should be contacted and asked to visit and inspect the flock. The farmer should ask the vet to write a brief report recording the important statistics such as the numbers dead, severely injured and treated. This report is vital evidence for the case.
  4. Keep the Evidence/Take a picture
    Pictures of dead sheep, injured sheep, dead dogs etc., should be taken on the spot with a smart phone etc., as this again can prove to be vitally important in terms of evidence. All dead sheep must be disposed of and recorded into the knackery.
  5. Get a valuation of losses
    Contact a local auctioneer or valuer and have any dead sheep valued on the spot and any other losses documented.
  6. Inform your insurance company
    It is very important to inform your insurance company of any dog attack as soon as possible after the incident occurs. Likewise it is very important to establish contact with the insurance company of the dog owner (home and/or farm insurance).
  7. Tell your sheep farming neighbours
    It is very important that other sheep farmers in the local area are aware of any dog attack in their vicinity, particularly if the dogs are not apprehended. Utilise the local community alert or text messaging facility if available.

That’s all for this week’s dog Guide we’ll be back next week with more advice for our four legged friends.

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